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FORUM: Collaboration in Kahui Āko

Today is the dayThe day has finally arrived for us to dive in and share our CoL stories - awesome some of us have been waiting a while. Communities of Learning | Kahui āko look different for everyone involved. Some CoLs have been established and under way for over a year, others are more recent. Leaders are now appointed who (in some cases) may have always worked with students or in small groups, who now work (and learn) alongside fellow colleagues as coaches and mentors.

No doubt you’ll want to share what’s on top for you, your role and your CoL. We invite you share any celebrations, frustrations, wonderings or ideas. All of which could also benefit others on a similar journey. For example, what do 'teachers as leaders' look like as you support each other during this professional learning process.

We’d also like to tease out the theme around collaboration. If we jump forward a little and assume your CoL has a shared vision, goals have been negotiated, a structure is in place, personnel have been appointed and roles assigned, then we can ask, now what? What does collaboration mean and do we know if we're successful in a collaborative model? It might be helpful to define what we mean by the term collaboration.

If we agree that teaching isn’t an isolated instance and that collectively we can make practice-based decisions that can ultimately lead to improved student outcomes, then what does collaboration look like beyond sharing?

edTalks: Collaboration beyond sharing, Rebbecca Sweeney

If the idea of collaboration is something that is new or needs further teasing out, then you might like to use a self-review tools like the Collaboration Framework (CORE Education) that can be used to help groups identify:

  • What effective collaboration that makes a difference for learners looks like

  • Next steps towards becoming a more effective collaborative group

  • A way of monitoring progress towards the collaborative state

If you are using this framework or something similar, we'd love to hear how this supports your CoL’s vision and goals.

Our CoL stories

Your turn, so what’s happening at your place? Tell us a little about your CoL, your role and what you hope to collectively achieve over the time you work together. ie:

  • What does leadership look like for you? Do you have role clarity for those involved within school and beyond? How are you building relational trust?
  • What does professional inquiry look like? Is it collaborative? What sort of evidence-based practice/frameworks are you using?
  • How are you addressing needs-based goals between and across schools? How will know if these have been achieved or successful?

We’d love to hear more.

Please feel free to introduce yourselves (just like others have started to already) and add your own stories below. If commenting, you can also acknowledge the stories that come before and find pathways to build on new knowledge/reflections. Similarly if you have any questions, feel free to ask, that way we'll strive to model collaboration in action. smiley

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Replies

  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 07 Sep 2017 7:50pm ()

    I love the idea of CoLs and COOLs I think they are the next big thing in education. I look forward to seamless ece to tertiary flow of pastoral, professional and pedagogical care for our ako students and staff.

    The best experiences i have had are wilth LoopEd, Wellyed and BEANZ - this is an adaptation of peoples thoughts on WellyEd so you can see why i think it is so pwerfula nd a modern unseen unrecinized unfunded CoL of regional and national significance

    I will write more on other CoL models later and answer the questions above i detail in my next post in 2hours time (after shopping for food with family)

     

    #Wellyed is a group of Wellington educators interested in fostering a community which shares its innovative practice, and offers ‘warm and demanding’ support for one another. The #wellyed blog https://wellyed.wordpress.com/ contains some great stories about education in Wellington, not just from the educators point of view but also the learners perspective.

     

    ​​From a WellyEd Blog Post

     
    • "During the webinar Tony Cairns (Wellington High School), Stephen Eames (Raroa Normal Intermediate), Leanne Stubbing (Kelburn Normal School) and Diana-Grace Morris (Ridgway School) all shared their thoughts on the benefits and advantages that come from being able to connect informally with a range of other teachers. In the webinar I described how much I appreciate the connections between the “lone-nuts” around the country and the ideas I am thinking about in my teaching practice. Stephen talked about how a collaborative group like #wellyed allows him to share ideas about what he is trying within his classroom, and have useful feedback from others. Both Leanne and Diana-Grace talked about how #wellyed is special community of teachers that helps to foster collaboration, in part by organising real-life meetups. Some of these events (https://wellyed.wordpress.com/latest-news-and-events/) are informal social ones, and others are more PD focused, for example the “play-dates” that allow teachers to explore games and the concept of gamification within education. These events have taken place at a range of secondary and primary schools across the Wellington area.  WellyED is a  great examples of “people-power” - passionate and engaged “lone-nuts” - teachers who have found ways to collaborate, innovate and educate.  

    From a WellyEd Presentation Draft

     

    WellyEd was the best because:

    • The networking of people from ECE to tertiary via primary, intermediate & secondary schools is  the key reason d'etre, message and mission of WellyEd
    • The social and PD benefits are a  strong network of connected educators and a ready made sounding board to challenge question and evaluate ideas
    • The The management structure is organic, free formed and responsive to individual events eg the un conferences held annually and the workshops
    • The regional and multi level multi school multi platform approach has extensive reach and quick flex responses via twitter and facebook
    • The level of confidence and trust built up in the participants moves them from the “lone nut’ status to an integrated gestalt that can respond quickly to local, national and transnational movements and ideas
    • The flat management structure encourages people stepping up taking responsibility and working together in a community of learners
    • The pre planning and post event analysis allows for excellent information sharing and efficient, low fuss but timely active shared planning of events

    WellyEd works so well because of it's:

    • DIVERSITY WellyED celebrated Diversity. The people, events & practices embrace the chance for the organization to be disrupted by difference
    • ETHOS The management structure is organic, free formed and responsive to individual events eg the un conferences held annually and the workshops
    • REACH The regional and multi level multi school multi platform approach has extensive reach and quick flex responses via twitter and facebook
    • RAPPORT The level of confidence and trust built up in the participants moves them from the “lone nut’ status to an integrated gestalt that can respond quickly to local, national and transnational movements and ideas
    • TRANSFORMATIONAL The flat management structure encourages people to step up, take responsibility and work together in a community of learners
    • PLANNING The pre planning and post event analysis allows for excellent information sharing and efficient, low fuss, active shared planning of events

    WellyEd Events:

    EducampWelly 2011
    EducampWelly 2013
    EducampWelly 2015
    EducampWelly 2017
    Powerpoints
    Welcome Speech
    Eduignite,
    St Bernard's
    WellyEd Videos

     

     

     

  • Sonya Van Schaijik (View all users posts) 09 Oct 2017 10:49am ()

    Hi Tessa and team

    We have just finished #TeachMeetNZ meets ACCoS.

    We had 8 educators share their stories from within Kāhui Ako.

    People can click this link to have access to all the presenters individual videos and presentations.

    In addition here is my reflection that shares the numbers from that initial session.

    Sonya

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 17 Oct 2017 4:14pm ()

    This is very generous of you to host and to share Sonya (as always). It was also lovely to see you at uLearn smiley

    I'm going to dive in soon and enjoy hearing/seeing these Kāhui Ako stories. 

    Enabling e-Learning has also published a page for Communities of Learning | Kāhui Ako as well as some fresh-off-the-printing-press video stories from schools. The more schools/kura/Cols share their stories so far, the better smiley!

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 31 Oct 2017 4:41pm ()

    Here’s a great update from Rotorua Central Kāhui Ako leader, Nancy Macfarlane about the developments in their CoL.

    Interesting to hear how they started with a 'theory of improvement' and then developed a comprehensive implementation plan that broke down how they were going to achieve every aspect within the 'theory of Improvement'. Then came a strategic plan with achievement goals to address over four years and a realisation (after working with their Expert Partner) that a vision and charter for the CoL as a whole was needed as well.

    Enabling e-Learning: Developing an action plan and strategic framework

    This little video shows just how organic and fluid the process for Kāhui Ako are as they collectively address the achievement goals within and across their schools.

    Has your Kāhui Ako started by clarifying a vision across the CoL or collated common needs/goals in a collaborative strategic planDo you have a similar or different story to share? 

Join this group to contribute to discussions.

e-Learning: Leadership

e-Learning: Leadership

Exploring leadership for change, vision, policy and strategy that integrates ICTs into learning.